Category Archives: Drug Abuse

703-844-0184 | Ketamine Treatment Center Virginia |Ketamine Center | Treating Alcohol Use with Ketamine? New Research Finds It May Help | Loudoun Virginia Ketamine | Arlington Virginia Ketamine Center | Alcohol Treatment Center | Addiction Treatment Center | Northern Virginia | 22101 | 22306

Call 703-844-0184 for an immediate appointment in Alexandria, Virginia for Ketamine Treatment for Alcoholism, Cocaine addiction, or opioid use disorder or email us below:

Security Code:
security code
Please enter the security code:

Submit

Treating Alcohol Use with Ketamine? New Research Finds It May Help

  • Results from new studies suggest that ketamine may be effective in treating alcohol use disorder.
  • Researchers found that when participants were treated with ketamine instead of midazolam, a sedative that helps with alcohol withdrawal, they had higher rates of stopping drinking following treatment.
  • They were also less likely to relapse, had fewer days of drinking, and had fewer days of heavy drinking.

Once derided as a “club drug,” the anesthetic ketamine is facing a surge of interest from doctors and researchers who say it could treat certain psychiatric disorders. The most prominent among them: depression.

However, a pair of new studies show promise for a new area of ketamine therapy: alcohol use disorder.

Both studies are early indicators that ketamine could, along with other alcohol interventions like therapy, some day help people decrease or stop drinking. But there’s a lot more research to be done.

The first study, published earlier this month in The American Journal of Psychiatry, was a pilot study, the first of its kind, to test the effects of ketamine and mindfulness practice against a control for alcohol use disorder.

The study included 40 participants who, on average, consumed about 5 drinks per day. Most of the participants were white, and most were employed.

Participants were randomly assigned to either receive a single infusion of ketamine along with a 5-week regimen of motivational enhancement therapy, or midazolam, a sedative that helps with alcohol withdrawal, and the same therapy.

Researchers found that participants who received ketamine rather than midazolam had higher rates of abstinence (stopping drinking) following treatment, were less likely to relapse, had fewer days of drinking, and had fewer days of heavy drinking.

The beneficial results of the ketamine also persisted for several weeks after the single dose infusion.

Call 703-844-0184 for home based ketamine treatment and Ketamine infusions for alcohol and depression

NOVA Health Recovery Ketamine Treatment Center for Alcoholism

Call 703-844-0184 for Treatment | Virginia

703-844-0184 | Ketamine Clinic for Depression | Arlington, Virginia 22201 | Ketamine Therapy for Cocaine abuse | Intranasal ketamine center Fairfax, Virginia| Spravato Virginia Center 22306 | Dr. Sendi Ketamine Center NOVA Health Recovery Northern Virginia Ketamine Center

NOVA Health Recovery | Alexandria, Va 22306 | Call for esketamine and nasal ketamine as well as IV Ketamine for depression, PTSD, anxiety  703-844-0184 < Link



Mindfulness-Based Prevention Outcomes for Cocaine Dependence Improved by Ketamine Injection

A single ketamine infusion improved several treatment outcomes in adults with cocaine dependence who were engaged in mindfulness-based behavior modification, according to study data published in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

Individuals seeking treatment for cocaine dependence (n=55) were randomly assigned to receive a 40-minute intravenous infusion of either ketamine (0.5 mg/kg) or midazolam (0.025 mg/kg) as part of a five-week trial. Patients were hospitalized for five days in a psychiatric research unit, during which time they received daily sessions of mindfulness-based relapse prevention. On day 2, patients received their infusion; on day 5, they were discharged. Patients then attended twice-weekly follow-up visits for four weeks, at which they continued their sessions and were assessed for various clinical variables. Cocaine use after discharge was assessed via patient interview and urine toxicology screening. A six-month follow-up interview was also conducted by telephone.

Demographic and clinical variables were similar in patients who received ketamine (n=27) and patients who received midazolam (n=28). Route of cocaine ingestion was controlled for in all analyses. A total of 48.2% of patients in the ketamine group remained abstinent during the last two weeks of the trial compared with 10.7% of the midazolam group. The odds of end-of-study abstinence in the ketamine group was nearly six times that in the midazolam group (odds ratio, 5.7; 95% CI, 1.3-25.1; =.02). Per Cox regression analysis, the ketamine group was 53% less likely to relapse compared with the midazolam group (hazard ratio, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.24-0.92; =.03). In addition, craving scores were 58.1% lower in the ketamine group than in the midazolam group (=.01). At the six-month telephone follow-up interview, 12 patients (44%) in the ketamine group reported abstinence compared with none in the midazolam group. The percentage of abstinent individuals was significantly associated with treatment group (<.001). 

A single ketamine infusion was associated with significantly improved treatment outcomes compared with midazolam in a cohort of adults with cocaine dependence. Further research in a larger sample is needed to confirm these findings.

Reference

Dakwar E, Nunes EV, Hart CL, et al. A single ketamine infusion combined with mindfulness-based behavioral modification to treat cocaine dependence: a randomized clinical trial [published online June 24, 2019]. Am J Psychiatry. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.2019.18101123