Category Archives: Intranasal ketamine

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VA uses ketamine to treat PTSD effectively

The San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center is administering ketamine to veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder and depression.

Tobias Marton, the director of the ketamine infusion program at the center, said that since the program first launched two years ago, they have treated about 40 patients who had virtually exhausted all other options.

“They’ve done everything we’ve asked them to do and they remain with very severe symptoms and with a poor or impaired quality of life,” he said. “Despite (past treatments), there remains a high risk of suicide (with some veterans).”

While it was not clear where the 40 patients are from, the option is something that is available to Humboldt County veterans who are suffering from PTSD or depression.

Marton said that in general, about a third of people diagnosed with depression don’t respond to first, second and third lines of treatment.

In contrast, ketamine infusion has yielded “impressive outcomes.”

Many people know of ketamine as a party drug, often referred to as Special K, but it is mainly used medically for anesthesia or pain treatment.

Miracle of medicine

“We know ketamine has rapid and powerful anti-suicide properties,” he said. “To have another tool, a potentially powerful tool to have an impact on suicide rates is really exciting.”

While Marton is proceeding with “cautious optimism,” Boris Nikolov, the CEO of Neurosciences Medical Clinic in Miami, Florida, which has a ketamine clinic, believes the application might be a medical breakthrough.

It’s one of the greatest discoveries in the field of depression,” he said. “This is one of the miracles in medicine.

Nikolov’s clinic has treated 120 patients with ketamine, including his wife who has PTSD as a result of severe child abuse.

“Ketamine really helped her,” he said. “That was a really big part of her recovery.”

Nikolov said most medicines that treat depression take from two to four weeks to start working. Ketamine begins working within hours after it is administered, a process which usually involves an IV infusion over the course of about an hour.

“What’s most important is the strong and fast effect of ketamine in patients who are very seriously depressed, or want to hurt themselves,” he said. “When they finish treatment, they’re totally different people. There is no other medication that does that.”

Brad Burge, the director of strategic communication at the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, or MAPS, said there has been “an explosion of treatment that’s outpaced research.”

“It means that people are going to have another option, an alternative to conventional medications,” he said.

According to Burge, MAPS believes the best form of ketamine infusion involves pairing with other forms of psychotherapy such as group or individual counseling.

Ketamine availability

While ketamine is an FDA-approved drug which has been used as an anesthetic as well as a pain reliever, it isn’t officially sanctioned by the FDA to be used for treating mental health disorders. However, Marton said that ketamine has been administered in this fashion for over 18 years now.

A company is currently in the process of trying to get an intranasal product approved by the FDA which would administer ketamine through the nasal passage, according to Marton. He expects the FDA’s decision to be announced sometime around March 2019.

If the product is approved, he said, VA clinics in rural communities like the one in Eureka would likely be able to start offering ketamine treatments as well.

For now, only the location in San Francisco is able to offer the treatment, but Marton said anyone within their service realm, which includes Humboldt County, is invited to consult with the VA about seeking treatment.

“We want to be as thoughtful as we can,” he said. “As we understand more about it … (we) might be able to start helping people who we haven’t been able to help despite throwing everything we have at them.”



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703-844-0184 | Ketamine Treatment Provider | Alexandria, Va 22306

 

 

 

What are the uses of ketamine?

Ketamine is a medication that is used to induce loss of consciousness, or anesthesia. It can produce relaxation and relieve pain in humans and animals.

It is a class III scheduled drug and is approved for use in hospitals and other medical settings as an anesthetic.

However, it is also a commonly abused “recreational” drug, due to its hallucinogenic, tranquilizing and dissociative effects.

Controversy has arisen about using ketamine “off-label” to treat depression. Off-label uses of drugs are uses that are not approved by the the United States, (U.S.) Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Ketamine is safe to use in controled, medical practice, but it has abuse potential. Used outside the approved limits, its adverse mental and physical health effects can be hazardous. Prolonged use can lead to tolerance and psychological addiction.

Fast facts on ketamine:Here are some key points about ketamine. More detail is in the main article.

  • Ketamine is similar in structure to phencyclidine (PCP), and it causes a trance-like state and a sense of disconnection from the environment.
  • It is the most widely used anesthetic in veterinary medicine and is used for some surgical procedures in humans.
  • It is considered a “club drug,” like ecstasy, and it has been abused as a date-rape drug.
  • Ketamine should only be used as prescribed by a doctor.

 

What is ketamine?

ketamine and dissociation
703-844-0184 | Ketamine Treatment Center | Fairfax, Va 22304

Ketamine can produce feelings of dissociation when used as a drug of abuse.

Ketamine belongs to a class of drugs known as dissociative anesthetics. It is also known as Ketalar, Ketanest, and Ketaset.

Other drugs in this category include the hallucinogen, phencyclidine (PCP), dextromethorphan (DXM), and nitrous oxide, or laughing gas.

These types of drugs can make a person feel detached from sensations and surroundings, as if they are floating outside their body.

 

Therapeutic uses

Ketamine is most often used in veterinary medicine. In humans, it can induce and maintain general anesthesia before, during, and after surgery.

For medical purposes, ketamine is either injected into a muscle or given through an intravenous (IV) line.

It is considered safe as an anesthetic, because it does not reduce blood pressure or lower the breathing rate.

The fact that it does not need an electricity supply, oxygen, or highly trained staff makes it a suitable option in less wealthy countries and in disaster zones.

In human medical practice, it is used in procedures such as:

  • cardiac catheterization
  • skin grafts
  • orthopedic procedures
  • diagnostic procedures on the eye, ear, nose, and throat
  • minor surgical interventions, such as dental extractions

It has been used in a hospital setting to control seizures in patients with status epilepticus (SE), a type of epilepsy that can lead to brain damage and death. However, researchers point out that ketamine is normally used for this purpose after 5 to 6 other options have proven ineffective. Ketamine for the treatment of refractory status epilepticus

It is also an analgesic, and, in lower doses, it can relieve pain.

In 2014, researchers found that a ketamine infusion significantly reduced symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 41 patients who had undergone a range of traumas.

Efficacy of intravenous ketamine for treatment of chronic posttraumatic stress disorder

Researchers are looking into other possible medical uses of ketamine, particularly in the areas of treatment-resistant depression, suicide prevention, and substance use disorders. However, this use is controversial.

 

Treating depression

Researchers for the American Psychological Association (APA) noted in April 2017 that a number of doctors prescribe ketamine “off-label,” for people with treatment-resistant depression.

However, they caution:

While ketamine may be beneficial to some patients with mood disorders, it is important to consider the limitations of the available data and the potential risk associated with the drug when considering the treatment option.”

The FDA has not yet approved it for treating depression.

In a study published in BMC Medical Ethics, researchers urge doctors to “minimize the risk to patients” by considering carefully the evidence before prescribing ketamine off-label for patients to treat depression and prevent suicide.

Citing “questionable practice” regarding the prescription of ketamine, they point out that there is not enough evidence to prove that ketamine is safe, and that some studies supporting its use have not been sufficiently rigorous in terms of research ethics.

They call for open debate, more research, and for doctors to try all other options first, before prescribing ketamine.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) are currently supporting research into whether ketamine may help people with treatment-resistant depression.

 

Effects

Ketamine use can have a wide variety of adverse effects, including:

  • drowsiness
  • changes in perceptions of color or sound
  • hallucinations, confusion, and delirium
  • dissociation from body or identity
  • agitation
  • difficulty thinking or learning
  • nausea
  • dilated pupils and changes in eyesight
  • inability to control eye movements
  • involuntary muscle movements and muscle stiffness
  • slurred speech
  • numbness
  • amnesia
  • slow heart beat
  • behavioral changes
  • increased pressure in the eyes and brain

It can also lead to a loss of appetite, upset stomach, and vomiting.

When used as an anesthetic in humans, doctors combine it with another drug to prevent hallucinations.

Risks

Ketamine is considered relatively safe in medical settings, because it does not affect the protective airway reflexes, and it does not depress the circulatory system, as other anesthetic medications do.

However, some patients have reported disturbing sensations when awakening from ketamine anesthesia.

Ketamine can cause an increase in blood pressure and intracranial pressure, or pressure in the brain.

People with the following conditions cannot receive ketamine for medical purposes:

  • brain swelling
  • glaucoma
  • brain lesion or tumor

It is used with caution in those with:

  • coronary artery disease
  • increased blood pressure
  • thyroid disease
  • chronic alcohol addiction
  • acute alcohol intoxication
  • aneurysm
  • chest pain
  • mental illness

These effects may be stronger in people aged over 65 years.

Some people may have an allergy to the ingredients. Patients with any type of allergy should tell their doctor before using any medication.

Anyone who is using this drug for therapeutic purposes on a regular basis should have regular blood pressure checks.

As a drug of abuse

Ketamine is most often used in the dance club setting as a party drug. It produces an abrupt high that lasts for about an hour. Users report euphoria, along with feelings of floating and other “out of body” sensations. Hallucinations, similar to those experienced with LSD, are common.

In 2014, 1.4 percent of 12th graders reported using ketamine for recreational purposes. This was down from 2002, when 2.6 percent reported using it.

Street names include:

  • Cat Valium
  • KitKat
  • Special K
  • Vitamin K
  • The horse tranquilizer
  • Ket
  • Purple
  • Super K
  • Jet

It is taken orally as a pill, snorted, smoked with tobacco or marijuana, or mixed into drinks. Most often, it is cooked into a white powder for snorting. Taken orally, it can cause severe nausea and vomiting.

Regardless of how it is ingested, its effects begin within a few minutes and last for less than an hour.

Higher doses can produce more intense effects known as being in the “K-hole,” where users become unable to move or communicate and feel very far away from their body.

Some users seek out this type of transcendental experience, while others find it terrifying and consider it an adverse effect.

Adverse effects

Unwanted effects include:

  • addiction
  • psychosis
  • amnesia
  • impaired motor function
  • high blood pressure
  • respiratory problems
  • seizures

As the user can become oblivious to their environment, ketamine abuse puts the person at risk of accidental injury to themselves and vulnerable to assault by others.

Problems with co-ordination, judgment, and the physical senses can continue for up to 24 hours. If an individual is using ketamine in a recreational setting, a sober friend should remain with them to ensure their safety.

Long-term effects include bladder and kidney problems, stomach pain, and memory loss.

If addiction and dependence develop, there is also a risk of depression.

Frequent, illegal use of ketamine can lead to serious mental disorders and major physical harm to the bladder, known as ketamine-induced ulcerative cystitis.

Ketamine and alcohol

Ketamine toxicity alone is unlikely to lead to death, according to the WHO. However, combining it with other substances, such as alcohol, can increase the sedative effects, possibly leading to a fatal overdose.

In the U.S., 1,550 emergency department (ED) visits were due to illegal ketamine use, and 71.5 percent of these also involved alcohol.

Overdose

The risk of overdose is high, because, for a recreational user, there is only a slight difference in dosage between obtaining the drug’s desired effects and an overdose.

Addiction

Ketamine is a Class III controlled substance. Prolonged use can cause dependence, tolerance, and withdrawal symptoms. Quitting can lead to depression, anxiety, insomnia, and flashbacks.

Chronic users have been known to “binge” their ketamine use in an attempt to experience again the dissociative, euphoric effects of their early first use.

The complications of long-term use can be fatal.

A final word

Ketamine is an anesthetic drug, used in human and veterinary medicine. It is important to distinguish the valid medical uses from the non-medical, recreational use of the drug.

When properly administered by a trained medical professional, ketamine is a safe and valuable medication.

Used in recreational settings, however, ketamine abuse can produce unpredictable physical and mental health results. In the long term, it can lead to psychological damage and, in some cases, death.

Any drug use should be prescribed by a doctor who knows the patient’s full medical history.

Intranasal Ketamine | 703-844-0184 | Ketamine Treatment Provider | Alexandria, Va 22306 | Loudon, Va | Ketamine for depression | What is Ketamine? | Psychedelics for depression | Ketamine for opioid use disorder | Ketamine doctor | Loudon, Va 22043 22046 22101 22102 22107 22108 22109 | IV Ketamine for depression | Ketamine for PTSD , OCD | Bipolar | Ketamine Infusion Center | 703-844-0184 | Loudon, Va | Ketamine IV Treatment Center | Ketamine Doctor | Intranasal Ketamine |Alexandria, Va 22306 | Ketamine for Depression | Intranasal Ketamine | OCD| CBD Center | Medical CBD | Medical THC Center | THC Doctor | Ketamine for Alcoholism | Intranasal Ketamine | 22043 22046 22101 22102 22106 22107 22108 22109 20175 20176 20147 20148 20151 22030 22031 22032 22034 22038 | IV Vitamin Therapy

 

703-844-0184 | Ketamine Treatment Provider | Alexandria, Va 22306

 

 

 

What are the uses of ketamine?

Ketamine is a medication that is used to induce loss of consciousness, or anesthesia. It can produce relaxation and relieve pain in humans and animals.

It is a class III scheduled drug and is approved for use in hospitals and other medical settings as an anesthetic.

However, it is also a commonly abused “recreational” drug, due to its hallucinogenic, tranquilizing and dissociative effects.

Controversy has arisen about using ketamine “off-label” to treat depression. Off-label uses of drugs are uses that are not approved by the the United States, (U.S.) Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Ketamine is safe to use in controled, medical practice, but it has abuse potential. Used outside the approved limits, its adverse mental and physical health effects can be hazardous. Prolonged use can lead to tolerance and psychological addiction.

Fast facts on ketamine:Here are some key points about ketamine. More detail is in the main article.

  • Ketamine is similar in structure to phencyclidine (PCP), and it causes a trance-like state and a sense of disconnection from the environment.
  • It is the most widely used anesthetic in veterinary medicine and is used for some surgical procedures in humans.
  • It is considered a “club drug,” like ecstasy, and it has been abused as a date-rape drug.
  • Ketamine should only be used as prescribed by a doctor.

 

What is ketamine?

ketamine and dissociation
703-844-0184 | Ketamine Treatment Center | Fairfax, Va 22304

Ketamine can produce feelings of dissociation when used as a drug of abuse.

Ketamine belongs to a class of drugs known as dissociative anesthetics. It is also known as Ketalar, Ketanest, and Ketaset.

Other drugs in this category include the hallucinogen, phencyclidine (PCP), dextromethorphan (DXM), and nitrous oxide, or laughing gas.

These types of drugs can make a person feel detached from sensations and surroundings, as if they are floating outside their body.

 

Therapeutic uses

Ketamine is most often used in veterinary medicine. In humans, it can induce and maintain general anesthesia before, during, and after surgery.

For medical purposes, ketamine is either injected into a muscle or given through an intravenous (IV) line.

It is considered safe as an anesthetic, because it does not reduce blood pressure or lower the breathing rate.

The fact that it does not need an electricity supply, oxygen, or highly trained staff makes it a suitable option in less wealthy countries and in disaster zones.

In human medical practice, it is used in procedures such as:

  • cardiac catheterization
  • skin grafts
  • orthopedic procedures
  • diagnostic procedures on the eye, ear, nose, and throat
  • minor surgical interventions, such as dental extractions

It has been used in a hospital setting to control seizures in patients with status epilepticus (SE), a type of epilepsy that can lead to brain damage and death. However, researchers point out that ketamine is normally used for this purpose after 5 to 6 other options have proven ineffective. Ketamine for the treatment of refractory status epilepticus

It is also an analgesic, and, in lower doses, it can relieve pain.

In 2014, researchers found that a ketamine infusion significantly reduced symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 41 patients who had undergone a range of traumas.

Efficacy of intravenous ketamine for treatment of chronic posttraumatic stress disorder

Researchers are looking into other possible medical uses of ketamine, particularly in the areas of treatment-resistant depression, suicide prevention, and substance use disorders. However, this use is controversial.

 

Treating depression

Researchers for the American Psychological Association (APA) noted in April 2017 that a number of doctors prescribe ketamine “off-label,” for people with treatment-resistant depression.

However, they caution:

While ketamine may be beneficial to some patients with mood disorders, it is important to consider the limitations of the available data and the potential risk associated with the drug when considering the treatment option.”

The FDA has not yet approved it for treating depression.

In a study published in BMC Medical Ethics, researchers urge doctors to “minimize the risk to patients” by considering carefully the evidence before prescribing ketamine off-label for patients to treat depression and prevent suicide.

Citing “questionable practice” regarding the prescription of ketamine, they point out that there is not enough evidence to prove that ketamine is safe, and that some studies supporting its use have not been sufficiently rigorous in terms of research ethics.

They call for open debate, more research, and for doctors to try all other options first, before prescribing ketamine.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) are currently supporting research into whether ketamine may help people with treatment-resistant depression.

 

Effects

Ketamine use can have a wide variety of adverse effects, including:

  • drowsiness
  • changes in perceptions of color or sound
  • hallucinations, confusion, and delirium
  • dissociation from body or identity
  • agitation
  • difficulty thinking or learning
  • nausea
  • dilated pupils and changes in eyesight
  • inability to control eye movements
  • involuntary muscle movements and muscle stiffness
  • slurred speech
  • numbness
  • amnesia
  • slow heart beat
  • behavioral changes
  • increased pressure in the eyes and brain

It can also lead to a loss of appetite, upset stomach, and vomiting.

When used as an anesthetic in humans, doctors combine it with another drug to prevent hallucinations.

Risks

Ketamine is considered relatively safe in medical settings, because it does not affect the protective airway reflexes, and it does not depress the circulatory system, as other anesthetic medications do.

However, some patients have reported disturbing sensations when awakening from ketamine anesthesia.

Ketamine can cause an increase in blood pressure and intracranial pressure, or pressure in the brain.

People with the following conditions cannot receive ketamine for medical purposes:

  • brain swelling
  • glaucoma
  • brain lesion or tumor

It is used with caution in those with:

  • coronary artery disease
  • increased blood pressure
  • thyroid disease
  • chronic alcohol addiction
  • acute alcohol intoxication
  • aneurysm
  • chest pain
  • mental illness

These effects may be stronger in people aged over 65 years.

Some people may have an allergy to the ingredients. Patients with any type of allergy should tell their doctor before using any medication.

Anyone who is using this drug for therapeutic purposes on a regular basis should have regular blood pressure checks.

As a drug of abuse

Ketamine is most often used in the dance club setting as a party drug. It produces an abrupt high that lasts for about an hour. Users report euphoria, along with feelings of floating and other “out of body” sensations. Hallucinations, similar to those experienced with LSD, are common.

In 2014, 1.4 percent of 12th graders reported using ketamine for recreational purposes. This was down from 2002, when 2.6 percent reported using it.

Street names include:

  • Cat Valium
  • KitKat
  • Special K
  • Vitamin K
  • The horse tranquilizer
  • Ket
  • Purple
  • Super K
  • Jet

It is taken orally as a pill, snorted, smoked with tobacco or marijuana, or mixed into drinks. Most often, it is cooked into a white powder for snorting. Taken orally, it can cause severe nausea and vomiting.

Regardless of how it is ingested, its effects begin within a few minutes and last for less than an hour.

Higher doses can produce more intense effects known as being in the “K-hole,” where users become unable to move or communicate and feel very far away from their body.

Some users seek out this type of transcendental experience, while others find it terrifying and consider it an adverse effect.

Adverse effects

Unwanted effects include:

  • addiction
  • psychosis
  • amnesia
  • impaired motor function
  • high blood pressure
  • respiratory problems
  • seizures

As the user can become oblivious to their environment, ketamine abuse puts the person at risk of accidental injury to themselves and vulnerable to assault by others.

Problems with co-ordination, judgment, and the physical senses can continue for up to 24 hours. If an individual is using ketamine in a recreational setting, a sober friend should remain with them to ensure their safety.

Long-term effects include bladder and kidney problems, stomach pain, and memory loss.

If addiction and dependence develop, there is also a risk of depression.

Frequent, illegal use of ketamine can lead to serious mental disorders and major physical harm to the bladder, known as ketamine-induced ulcerative cystitis.

Ketamine and alcohol

Ketamine toxicity alone is unlikely to lead to death, according to the WHO. However, combining it with other substances, such as alcohol, can increase the sedative effects, possibly leading to a fatal overdose.

In the U.S., 1,550 emergency department (ED) visits were due to illegal ketamine use, and 71.5 percent of these also involved alcohol.

Overdose

The risk of overdose is high, because, for a recreational user, there is only a slight difference in dosage between obtaining the drug’s desired effects and an overdose.

Addiction

Ketamine is a Class III controlled substance. Prolonged use can cause dependence, tolerance, and withdrawal symptoms. Quitting can lead to depression, anxiety, insomnia, and flashbacks.

Chronic users have been known to “binge” their ketamine use in an attempt to experience again the dissociative, euphoric effects of their early first use.

The complications of long-term use can be fatal.

A final word

Ketamine is an anesthetic drug, used in human and veterinary medicine. It is important to distinguish the valid medical uses from the non-medical, recreational use of the drug.

When properly administered by a trained medical professional, ketamine is a safe and valuable medication.

Used in recreational settings, however, ketamine abuse can produce unpredictable physical and mental health results. In the long term, it can lead to psychological damage and, in some cases, death.

Any drug use should be prescribed by a doctor who knows the patient’s full medical history.

Link

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703-844-0184 | Ketamine for depression | Alexandria, Va 22306 | Ketamine Treatment Center | Call for an appointment – Dr. Sendi

Is ketamine safe? What are some reasons I would not be eligible (contraindications)?

Ketamine is a unique among anesthetic medications in that it is extremely safe, having been used in various settings for more than fifty years, even in poorly monitored settings such as battlefield anesthesia and developing countries, “ketamine has a good safety profile and is easy to use, especially in under-resourced health systems and emergency settings where clinical conditions and medical equipment are generally not available” (World Health Organization).  Ketamine has an even higher margin of safety when used to treat depression because such doses are much lower than those used in surgery. Patients typically remain conscious the entire time, though may feel somewhat altered and experience perceptual changes.  When used in higher surgical and anesthetic doses, ketamine requires the presence of an anesthesiologist for full airway and cardiac monitoring, while the lower doses used in depression do not.  There are specific reasons you would not be eligible for ketamine, including recent myocardial infarction (heart attack), recent psychosis (hallucinations, delusions), or recent bladder inflammation (cystitis). Administration of ketamine and medical monitoring throughout the session is performed by Dr. Sendi, and not by nurses or personnel with less medical training.

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WHO Recommends against International Control of Ketamine

20160309_FactFile_Ketamine

What is the best route of administration for treatment of depression?

As noted above, ketamine can be administered in several different ways: by an intravenous infusion, an intramuscular injection, intranasally, sublingually, and orally. Intravenous ketamine infusions have been most studied because of their historical use and original FDA approval decades ago, though more and more studies are finding comparable efficacy with the other routes of administration.  It is not clear that intravenous ketamine infusions are more effective than other routes of administration, and further results in great patient discomfort, greater resource utilization, and ultimately result in a higher cost.  For this reason I typically offer ketamine via the intramuscular route, which appears to be non-inferior in terms of efficacy for depression.Here is a link to an article on Ketamine and depression:   the International Journal of Transpersonal Studies: Ketamine and depression: a review.

Am I a good candidate?  How are ketamine treatments structured?

Prior to initiating ketamine treatments, some  potential patients are scheduled for an initial psychiatric evaluation.  On this first meeting, we will determine a diagnosis, develop a treatment plan, and assess for any medical or psychiatric issues that may interfere with ketamine treatment. If we mutually agree that ketamine could be beneficial, then we can schedule a subsequent visit for the actual administration; with some planning, it is possible for both the intake and administration to be done on the same day.  The greatest benefit of ketamine is attained with multiple administrations over the first few weeks of treatment, which is then followed by periodic booster treatments to maintain freedom from depression.  I ask patients to commit to a series of 6 administrations over 3 weeks, and then return for periodic bimonthly to monthly booster treatments thereafter to prevent depression from returning. Please note, it is always your option to stop treatment at any time. Patients must have a friend or family member pick them up after the appointment, as ketamine temporarily impairs one’s ability to drive. Ketamine sessions are scheduled for 90 minutes in duration, and involve a brief medication management visit, the actual ketamine administration, followed by psychotherapy, all of which is integrated into one visit.

For individuals interested in ketamine treatments, please print out the informed consent  and bring it with you to our appointment.  I will have you sign it after an in depth discussion about the risks, benefits, and alternatives available to you.

Are there any precautions?

Individuals receiving ketamine should abstain from any food or drink for the 6 hours prior to receiving the medication, and furthermore, should not drive for the remainder of the day. This is a necessary precaution because the subtle after effects of ketamine can linger for hours after the treatment and impair the ability to drive.  Effects typically resolve by the following day, at which time driving is allowed. Typically patients arrange a ride home with a friend or family member, and once tolerability is established can later use a taxi or ride sharing service to return home.

What is the cost of ketamine treatments? Do insurance companies cover it?

I do not directly contract with insurance companies, but instead collect the full fee at time of the visit and provide patients with a superbill that can be submitted to their insurance provider for reimbursement.  Current fees can be found on the new patient intake form, available here.

Visits may be partially covered depending on your insurance plan.  The ketamine administration itself is generally not covered by insurance, however the typical 90 minute long ketamine treatment session involves several other components which may be reimbursed for: the brief medication management (99213, 99214, or 99215) and psychotherapy visit (90833 or 90834) are typically covered by insurance, though this cannot be guaranteed.  In addition, the initial psychiatric evaluation visit (99205) is also typically covered.  I suggest potential patients check with their insurance provider to see what their out-of-network coverage benefits are for the above procedures/CPT codes.  PPO type insurances usually allow for out-of-network benefits, while HMO plans do not.

What can you tell me about the use of ketamine for treatment of addiction or substance use disorders?

Ketamine has been studied for treatment of addiction, specifically to the opiate and street drug, heroin.  Findings suggest that ketamine, as part of a structured therapy program, is effective for the treatment of addiction, perhaps due to biochemical properties as an NMDA receptor antagonist. While studies examining this particular application of ketamine are more limited than those examining treatment of depression, work with compounds that create similar states of consciousness–such as the “classical hallucinogens”: LSD, psilocybin, mescaline, DMT, and ayahuasca–suggest a role for altered states independent of the biochemical effects of ketamine.  Such compounds seem to work to treat addiction via their ability to produce spiritual or mystical experiences. While such “classical hallucinogens” are not currently available for clinical use, there exists a growing literature detailing successful and robust treatment of tobacco and alcohol addiction. Use of the aforementioned compounds outside of a research setting is however illegal, except for ketamine which has been FDA approved for other indications and is consequently available for off-label use to treat such diagnoses as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and addiction / substance use disorders.

What other psychiatric conditions has ketamine been used for?

Treatment resistant depression is, by far, the most extensively studied psychiatric application of ketamine, and has a wealth of data to support its use.  Other indications (or reasons to use ketamine) include drug or alcohol use disorders (specifically for opioid or cocaine use disorders),  Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia.  On the other hand, data suggests ketamine is less effective for treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), but may be worth pursuing on a case by case basis.

Efficacy of intravenous ketamine for treatment of chronic posttraumatic stress disorder a randomized clinical trial.

Where can I learn more?

You are invited to read a review article on ketamine for depression.  The full text is available free of charge from the California Institute of Integral Studies [ full text ].  Ketamine and Depression_ A Review An updated version of this review is available as a book chapter in a larger publication on ketamine.  The book, entitled The Ketamine Papers–Science, Therapy and Transformation, is published by the non-profit Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) and available for purchase through their website and amazon [ order the book via MAPS, or via amazon ].  Also available is a video recording of a presentation on ketamine that I gave for the Aware Project [ YouTube video ].

 

 

 

The Ketamine Papers

 

 2007 Mar;39(1):13-9.

Single versus repeated sessions of ketamine-assisted psychotherapy for people with heroin dependence.

Abstract

A prior study found that one ketamine-assisted psychotherapy session was significantly more effective than active placebo in promoting abstinence (Krupitsky et al. 2002). In this study of the efficacy of single versus repeated sessions of ketamine-assisted psychotherapy in promoting abstinence in people with heroin dependence, 59 detoxified inpatients with heroin dependence received a ketamine-assisted psychotherapy (KPT) session prior to their discharge from an addiction treatment hospital, and were then randomized into two treatment groups. Participants in the first group received two addiction counseling sessions followed by two KPT sessions, with sessions scheduled on a monthly interval (multiple KPT group). Participants in the second group received two addiction counseling sessions on a monthly interval, but no additional ketamine therapy sessions (single KPT group). At one-year follow-up, survival analysis demonstrated a significantly higher rate of abstinence in the multiple KPT group. Thirteen out of 26 subjects (50%) in the multiple KPT group remained abstinent, compared to 6 out of 27 subjects (22.2%) in the single KPT group (p < 0.05). No differences between groups were found in depression, anxiety, craving for heroin, or their understanding of the meaning of their lives. It was concluded that three sessions of ketamine-assisted psychotherapy are more effective than a single session for the treatment of heroin addiction.

How to use psychedelics

How to Take Ketamine to Treat Depression, Anxiety and PTSD

Ketamine is a legal prescription medication used for a variety of purposes– as a pain killer, sedative, anesthetic, and anti-depressant. It’s one of the safest anesthetics in the world and is available in every hospital. Ketamine’s use as an anti-depressant and PTSD treament is growing very quickly and research studies are expanding. Here’s a directory of US doctors offering ketamine treatment for depression, bipolar, PTSD, and other mood disorders.

As the BBC wrote in a 2014 article about ketamine, “Some patients who have faced incurable depression for decades have had symptoms disappear within hours of taking low doses of the drug.”

What makes Ketamine so remarkable for treating depression is that its positive effects begin almost immediately, within 1 – 12 hours, compared to SSRIs that may take weeks to start working, if they work at all. Ketamine also seems to have much fewer side effects than SSRIs (though it hasn’t been studied much for long term use) and is incredibly effective as a treatment for people who don’t respond well to SSRIs and other anti-depressants. If you’ve had limited success with other treatment methods you may respond very well to ketamine.

Before you begin, be sure to read our safety section and ensure that you aren’t taking any medication or supplements that interact with Ketamine.

Dosage

Dosage for ketamine varies depending on whether it’s taken intranasally, intravenously (IV), orally, or sublingually. We recommend taking ketamine orally or sublingually because it’s safe and easy. Many doctors and treatment centers will give ketamine in an IV. Treatment with a doctor / center can be quite expensive but you may be able to find a doctor or center in your area if you google around.

The anti-depressant effect of ketamine typically wears off after a while (a few days to a month), though the relief that is felt while it is active can often lead to lasting improvements. There are various protocols for using ketamine to treat depression– some people take small amounts daily, others weekly, and others monthly. We recommend starting with a moderate dose once a week and adjusting based on how it feels.

How to Take Ketamine Sublingually (Under the Tongue)

Sublingual ketamine seems much more potent than oral ketamine. We suggest starting with a very small “microdose” and trying a little more each session until you find the minimum amount that works for you. You should almost certainly see results using .3mg of ketamine per pound of body weight (or .75mg per kg of body weight). This works out to about 50mg for someone who weighs 160lbs (72kg). But start far below that.

  • STEP ONE
    Prepare your ketamine solution. You’ll want to use one of those little bottles that has an eyedropper in the lid. Maybe you have one around the house with some sort of herbal tincture. Boil some water, then let it cool. Using the eyedropper, wash out the dropper and the bottle with the water, just to get rid of any residue. Put a known amount of ketamine into the bottle. Then add water to the bottle using the eyedropper, carefully counting the drops. You want to use as few drops as possible to dissolve all the ketamine. In a lab you should be able to dissolve 5mg ketamine per drop. If you add this much water and you still see some undissolved ketamine in there, add just enough water to dissolve it all. Carefully swirl it around to speed things up. Now you can give yourself microdoses of ketamine. Just divide the amount of ketamine by the number of drops. If you had 1000mg of ketamine, and added 200 drops of water, you’d know there was 5mg ketamine per drop.
  • TWO
    Find a place where you can sit or lie down comfortably for an hour. Unlike traditional psychedelics like mushrooms, LSD, and even MDMA, the benefits of ketamine do not seem to derive from an exploratory experience while taking the medicine. In addition, the experience at an effective dose is much more gentle. You can read a book, watch TV, etc.
  • THREE
    Looking at yourself in a mirror, put one or two drops under your tongue. This is probably at most 5-10mg. Don’t swallow it, just leave it under your tongue. After 5 minutes or so, you can swallow.
  • FOUR
    The effects will be very subtle but you might feel a slight mellow or sleepy feeling in about 5-15 minutes.
  • FIVE
    The anti-depressant effects of the ketamine generally start to appear about two hours after taking the first dose. In some people the anti-depressant effect is strong right away and in some people it gradually grows over 1-4 days– so you might feel the most relief 4 days after taking the dose.
  • SIX
    See how you feel the next day. If you are less depressed, great! If not, the next time try the previous dose plus one more drop. Don’t take ketamine two days in a row. Once you find a dose that seems to work, see how many days you can wait between doses. Ideally, you would take a dose once a week or once a month. Worst-case, you’d take it every other day. If you get up to 50mg sublingually and it still doesn’t work, it might just not work for you in general.

How to Take Ketamine Orally

We suggest using .6mg of ketamine per pound of body weight (or 1.5mg per kg of body weight). This works out to about 100mg for someone who weighs 160lbs (72kg).

Remember these are oral doses– usually mixed with warm water and swallowed. If you are taking ketamine in an IV the doses should be much, much lower.

  • STEP ONE
    Find a place where you can sit or lie down comfortably for an hour. Unlike traditional psychedelics like mushrooms, LSD, and even MDMA, the benefits of ketamine do not seem to derive from an exploratory experience while taking the medicine. In addition, the experience at an effective dose is much more gentle. You can read a book, watch TV, etc.
  • TWO
    Make sure you have the right dose measured and ready. If you don’t have a mg scale, you can order them cheaply anywhere, including Amazon. They are about $20-$30.
  • THREE
    If it’s your first time, mix about 1/5th of the dose with about an inch of warm water in a mug. If you are taking about 100mg, that would be roughly 20mg. Once you mix it, drink it.
  • FOUR
    A 1/5th dose will be very subtle but you should be able to feel a nice mellow or sleepy feeling in about 5-15 minutes. After 15 minutes, if you feel comfortable with that test dose (and it’s fine if you don’t feel anything at all), then you can mix the rest of the dose with warm water and drink it.
  • FIVE
    As you feel the effects of the dose, again after 5-15 minutes, you will likely feel sleepy or mellow. You can rest, read, watch tv, etc. After about 45 minutes to an hour, the effects will be mostly gone, though you may still feel very relaxed or sleepy for a couple more hours.
  • SIX
    The anti-depressant effects of the ketamine generally start to appear about two hours after taking the first dose. In some people the anti-depressant effect is strong right away and in some people it gradually grows over 1-4 days– so you might feel the most relief 4 days after taking the dose.

Afterwards

The anti-depressant effects of ketamine last for days and sometimes weeks or even a month. We suggest starting with weekly re-dosing, using the same dose, and seeing how it goes. If you find that you don’t need to redose after a week, then wait longer and see how things go. It’s always good to err on the side of taking too little rather than too much. Some people need to redose more often, every few days. You’ll probably get a sense pretty quickly of what works for you.

Special Safety Considerations

Always research any supplements or other medicines that you may be taking to avoid interactions. Here’s a Medscape list of potential interactions. (Note that the dosing levels listed on that site are for inducing anesthesia, which is way way more than what is use for anti-depressant effects.)

Articles and Research on Ketamine for Anxiety and Depression

Research on ketamine is growing quickly and some drug companies are trying to create new versions of ketamine that they can patent.

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One more reason to treat your depression rapidly with Ketamine:

 

Depression Linked to Increased Risk of Developing Atrial Fibrillation

NEW YORK—Depression appears to be a risk factor for atrial fibrillation, the most common arrhythmia in the U.S., according to new observational data from the national Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) study.

Considering that 20% of U.S. adults report depressive symptoms, “our findings identify a large portion of the U.S. population that is potentially at an increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation and who may benefit from more targeted efforts to prevent atrial fibrillation,” Dr. Parveen Garg, from the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, told Reuters Health by email.

He presented the study March 22 at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention/Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions in New Orleans.

The analysis included 6,644 adults (mean age, 62; 53% women, 38% white, 28% black, 22% Hispanic, 12% Chinese-American) with no known heart disease at baseline who were followed for a median of 13 years as part of the MESA study.

In the fully adjusted model, individuals with a Centers for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) score of 16 or higher (indicating clinically relevant depressive symptoms) had a 34% (P=0.039) higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation during follow-up compared with those with a CES-D score of less than 2. Similarly, individuals reporting antidepressant use had a significant 36% increase in their risk of developing atrial fibrillation compared with those not on the drugs.

“An important next step is to confirm these results in other studies, especially those with more comprehensive and clinically validated assessments of depression. If confirmed, then it will be important to determine if treating individuals with depression actually reduces their risk of atrial fibrillation,” Dr. Garg said.

Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain a possible link between depression and atrial fibrillation, Dr. Garg explained. Depression can increase systemic inflammation and activate the autonomic nervous system, which increases catecholamine levels, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, which increases cortisol levels. Depression may also activate the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system.

“Taken together, these changes may induce atrial fibrillation susceptibility either directly by disrupting the electrophysiologic properties of the atria or indirectly by promoting atrial fibrosis, increasing the atrial pressure,” Dr. Garg said, adding that further research is needed to fully understand the mechanisms involved.

Dr. Gordon Tomaselli, a spokesman for the American Heart Association, said this study “affirms the association between depression and atrial fibrillation in a population that I think is important because it’s a mixed population and not just the standard Caucasian population.”

“There are some associated risk factors in people with depression that might increase their risk of atrial fibrillation, including an increased incidence of hypertension in some patients who have depression as well as other disorders that might be driven by activation of the sympathetic nervous system like anxiety disorder. So there are several reasons why people might have depression and atrial fibrillation,” Dr. Tomaselli, who was not involved in the research, told Reuters Health by phone.

“One question is what should we do about it, and I’m not sure we have an answer from this study except to make sure that we are looking for symptoms of depression,” he said. “We don’t know whether treatment of depression will reduce the incidence of atrial fibrillation. There is some reason to think that it might, but there are other reasons to think that antidepressant drugs actually have some effects on the heart, the ion channels that determine the rhythm of the heart.”

The study had no commercial funding and the authors have no relevant disclosures.

SOURCE: https://bit.ly/2pCdkOA

AHA Epidemiology and Prevention – Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018.