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How Does Ketamine Work? How Does Ketamine Prevent Deaths of Despair? Serotonin 1B Receptors and Ketamine | Northern Virginia Ketamine Infusion Center | Ketamine Assisted Psychotherapy

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How Does Ketamine Work? How Does Ketamine Prevent Deaths of Despair? 

There are numerous pathways through which ketamine appears to work to resolve depression. Ketamine demonstrates efficacy the rapid relief of suicidalityPTSDBipolar depression, and pain. Glutamate is the neurotransmitter that appears to be a primary molecule involved in learning and is an excitatory neurotransmitter in the cerebrum. Disorders in glutamate result in depression and mood disorders. A recent study demonstrated the importance of Serotonin 1B receptors in depression and how ketamine improves that. 

A randomized placebo-controlled PET study of ketamine´s effect on serotonin1B receptor binding in patients with SSRI-resistant depression 

Low Serotonin 1B receptors have been found in limbic areas of the brain in major depression disorder (MDD). Ketamine upregulates AMPA receptor activity and results in increased 5-HT1B receptor binding in the ventral striatum (involved in depression). 

In the study, PET scans were used to image serotonin receptor binding after ketamine infusions in 30 patients. Low levels of serotonin correlate with severe depression. During the study, a certain portion of the patients underwent ketamine infusions twice a week for two weeks, and 70% of those patients had improvement in their depression scores. Based in the PET scans, ketamine reduces the output of serotonin and increased dopamine (the reward molecule). Ketamine increased the number of Serotonin 1B receptors and the higher number of Serotonin 1B receptors correlates with less depression. 

Key points: 

Subanesthetic dosing of ketamine has been effective in the rapid reduction of depression over hours as opposed to weeks with traditional treatments: 

Antidepressant effects of ketamine in depressed patients 

Glutamate is the key neurotransmitter involved in mood disorders based on recent theories: 

The role of glutamate in mood disorders: results from the ketamine in major depression study and the presumed cellular mechanism underlying its antidepressant effects 

The NMDA receptor (N-methyl-D-aspartate ) antagonism by ketamine plays a key role in the effectiveness of ketamine’s antidepressant effect: 

 
The acute effects of NMDA antagonism: from the rodent to the human brain 

Ketamine interacts with several receptors in the brain and impacts neurotransmitters through affinity for opioid, muscarinic, nicotinic, and serotonin (5-HT)2 receptors: 

 
Classics in Chemical Neuroscience: Ketamine 

Ketamine, much like other antidepressants, seems to increase serotonin in areas of the brain such as the prefrontal cortex and depletion of serotonin results in decreased antidepressant effects with ketamine: 

Role of Serotonin and Noradrenaline in the Rapid Antidepressant Action of Ketamine 

In the positron emission tomography (PET) studies of in vivo 5-HT1B receptor binding in MDD, low binding in the hippocampus and in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) has been reported both in patients with recurrent MDD: 

Low serotonin1B receptor binding potential in the anterior cingulate cortex in drug-free patients with recurrent major depressive disorder 

PTSD also presents with reduced serotonin 1B receptors as well: 

The Effect of Early Trauma Exposure on Serotonin Type 1B Receptor Expression Revealed by Reduced Selective Radioligand Binding 

In patients with a family history of depression, it is noted that 5-HT1B receptor binding was low in the ventral striatum (VST) and ventral pallidum: 

Reduced ventral striatal/ventral pallidal serotonin1B receptor binding potential in major depressive disorder 

The VST is a key structure in the reward system, implicated in anhedonia – the presence of no mood that can accompany MDD and 5-HT1B receptor binding is high in the VST: 

Circuit-based frameworks of depressive behaviors: The role of reward circuitry and beyond 

Per this studyketamine increased 5-HT1B receptor binding in regions with reported low 5-HT1B receptor levels, such as the hippocampus, ACC (Anterior Cingulate Cortex), and VST and this resulted in diminished depression. 

What does this mean for you? 

The bottom line is that ketamine still improved depression in 70% of treatment failures through still-debated mechanisms. The improvement of the Serotonin 1B receptor is just another piece of the puzzle.  

703-844-0184 | Arlington, Virginia Ketamine Infusion Provider | Sarcosine, Nitrous oxide, and buprenorphine for depression. Alexandria, Virginia Ketamine Infusion Center | Loudoun County Virginia Ketamine | IV Vitamin and Glutathione Center | IV NAD+ Virginia Center 22308

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Recent research has shown that ketamine has considerable promise for treating a wide range of treatment-refractory neuropsychiatric disorders, including obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), bipolar disorder, suicide ideation, addiction and, most notably, treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD). Although this research has taken place almost exclusively within the past two decades, evidence of ketamine’s neuropsychiatric effects appeared long before this. For example, ketamine was used throughout the 1970s in Mexico as part of psychedelic therapy sessions that combined traditional healing practices with psychoanalytic techniques.

In 2000, researchers found that ketamine had strong, fast-acting, and long-term effects in depression. In a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover design study, patients with depression received 0.5 mg/kg of ketamine or saline on the first day of testing. Treatments were switched 1 week later. Researchers found that the antidepressant effects of ketamine began within 4 hours, peaked at 72 hours, and lasted for 1 to 2 weeks thereafter.1 In a 2006 study, this finding was replicated in an independent group of 18 patients with major depressive disorder who were resistant to other treatments. Compared with participants who received placebo, those who received ketamine showed significant improvement in symptoms within 110 minutes, with 35% maintaining significant response for at least 1 week.

Many of today’s depression treatments are monoaminergic-based, including monoamine oxidase inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. These treatments have been proven effective for a large number of patients. However, a significant subset of patients with major depressive disorder do not respond to these agents. Despite its undisputed value to the field, the monoamine hypothesis of depression cannot fully explain the heterogeneity of MDD. In the 1990s, animal models began to implicate glutamate – one of the major excitatory neurotransmitters in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) – as well as its ionotropic NMDA receptor in the etiology and treatment of mood disorders .

Existing antidepressant treatments [MAOIs, TCAs, SSRIs, and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs)] are monoaminergic-based treatments. Although they have been in use for decades and have helped many patients, a significant subset of MDD patients showed little to no therapeutic benefit in response to these agents. For instance, the NIMH-funded, communitybased Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study of >4000 MDD patients found that, even after four unique medication trials, augmentation, or switch, 33% of the patients did not respond to standard monoaminergic-based treatments .

In 2000, Berman and colleagues discovered that ketamine exerted rapid, robust, and relatively sustained antidepressant effects in depressed patients . Using a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover design, each patient received an i.v. infusion of 0.5 mg/kg of either ketamine or saline on the first test day. On the following test day, which took place at least 1 week later, treatments were switched. The authors found that ketamine exerted antidepressant effects that began within 4 h of the infusion, peaked at 72 h, and persisted for 1–2 weeks post-infusion. .Ketamine has also been shown to have distinct and independent antisuicidal and anti-anhedonic effects in patients with mood disorders .

Another limitation of currently available antidepressants is that their clinical effects take more time to reach their full therapeutic potential (for instance, the mean onset for paroxetine is 13 days). This is a substantial disadvantage during an acute depressive crisis. Furthermore, even when these agents do alleviate depressive symptoms, evidence regarding their ability to successfully reduce suicide ideation and behavior remains inconclusive . In contrast, a single dose (0.5 mg/kg) of i.v. ketamine exerts rapid and profound antidepressant effects within hours to days of administration . Ketamine also rapidly reduces suicidel ideation, an effect that appears to occur independently of its antidepressant properties . Ketamine has dose-dependent neuropsychological effects even at subanesthetic doses, with antidepressant properties peaking at 0.5–1.0 mg/kg.

Ketamine’s pan-therapeutic effects also include alleviating fatigue and anhedonia as well as improving sleep measures such as circadian rhythm and slow-wave activity in MDD patients .

The positive effects of Ketamine has led to research into other rapidly acting antisdepressants, including nasal ketamine. Lapidus and colleagues demonstrated that intranasal ketamine had antidepressant effects and led to sufficiently high ketamine plasma concentrations. We use a compounded intranasal ketamine miuxture in our office at NOVA Health Recovery. There is also an FDA approved version more recently, which has only the S-Ketamine in it . There are heavy restrictions and high costs to the FDA approved version, yet efficacy may not be any better.

Noitrois Oxide also has antidepressant effects. Like ketamine, it exhibits NMDA receptor antagonism, has partial agonism for mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors, inhibits AMPA, kainite, and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors A and C (GABAA, GABAC), affects serotonin-3 receptors (5-HT3), and releases dopamine . In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial, depressive symptoms improved for participants receiving nitrous oxide within 2 h compared with those receiving placebo, an effect that remained significant at 1 day post-treatment. Phase I and II trials are ongoing to determine optimal dose, safety, and efficacy.

Sarcosine also has antidepressant effects. t, sarcosine (also known as N-methylglycine), is an amino acid that functions as a glycine transporter-1 inhibitor and a 6- week, double-blind, randomized, citalopram-controlled trial in 20 MDD patients found that sarcosine possessed superior antidepressant properties compared with citalopram after 2 weeks . Notably, and in contrast to ketamine, sarcosine did not result in rapid-acting effects on the timescale of several days. Sarcosine has co-agonistic properties at the NMDA receptor and is an agonist at the inhibitory glycine receptor. It also exhibits NMDA-enhancing properties, suggesting that AMPA-receptor-mediated or other downstream mechanisms might elicit antidepressant effects. NMDA receptor downregulation might also play a part .

Suboxone (Buprenorphine) also has antidepressant effects as well. Intrigued by the potential of nonaminergic antidepressant mechanisms, researchers have begun to re-evaluate the role of endogenous opioids in depression. For instance, buprenorphine (BUP), a drug currently used to treat opioid addiction and pain disorders, is being explored as a treatment for MDD. The compound has a wide variety of actions throughout the brain, including partial agonism at the mu opioid receptor and antagonism at the kappa and delta opioid receptors ; these are connected to intracellular signaling cascades that potentially mediate antidepressant effects Several open-label studies of BUP in MDD have shown promising preliminary results, and a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial examining the effect of low-dose BUP on suicidal ideation similarly yielded positive results .

NOVA Health Recovery has used buprenorphine succesfully in the treatment of depression.

Ketamine and Future Depression Treatments

1. Kraus C, Wasserman D, Henter ID, Acevedo-Diaz E, Kadriu B, Zarate CA Jr. The influence of ketamine on drug discovery in depression [published online August 2, 2019]. Drug Discov Today. doi: 10.1016/j.drudis.2019.07.007

2. Zarate CA Jr, Singh JB, Carlson PJ, et al. A randomized trial of an N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist in treatment-resistant major depressionArch Gen Psychiatry. 2006;63(8):856-64.

3. Nagele P, Duma A, Kopec M, et al. Nitrous oxide for treatment-resistant major depression: a proof-of-concept trialBiol Psychiatry. 2015;78(1):10-18.

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If you would like a consultation for Ketamine for alcoholism treatment in Virginia, call 703-844-0184 or email Northern Virginia Ketamine Infusion Center

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Ketamine may treat harmful drinking behavior by ‘rewriting drinking memories,’ researchers say

(CNN)A single dose of ketamine may be able to curb harmful drinking behavior by “rewriting drinking memories,” according to a study published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications.The researchers say that, when coupled with an exercise involving beer that pulls memories of alcohol to the foreground, there’s evidence that the drug can disrupt how the brain associates these cues — like the smell or taste of beer — to its perceived “reward,” making relapse less likely.”It’s those kinds of associations that we’re trying to break down,” explained study author Ravi Das, an associate professor at University College London who specializes in psychopharmacology. “We’re not talking about people’s explicit recollection of the fact that they drank in the past.” FDA approves ketamine-like nasal spray for depressionKetamine is a powerful medication used in hospitals primarily as an anesthetic, though it has also been used illegally as a club drug, often referred to as Special K. It generates an intense high and dissociative effects.  “It’s an intriguing approach that builds on existing literature in a couple of areas,” said Dr. Henry Kranzler, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, who was not involved in the study.Earlier studies have explored ketamine for alcohol, cocaine and opioid addiction — but many had small sample sizes, limited follow-up and lack of placebo, according to experts. Das said it’s also difficult to blind participants to whether they’ve received ketamine or a placebo because of its “strong effects.”Other research has shown the drug’s potential to counter depression and suicidal ideation. In March, a close relative of ketamine — called esketamine and sold under the name Spravato in the form of a nasal spray — was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment-resistant depression.The new study recruited 90 “beer-preferring” people with potentially harmful drinking patterns from internet ads and separated them into groups: those who underwent an exercise involving alcohol-related cues and received intravenous ketamine in a controlled environment; those who completed the exercise but received a placebo; and those who received ketamine alone. While the authors said participants “showed a clearly harmful and problematic pattern of drinking,” they were not seeking treatment for an alcohol use disorder and had not been formally diagnosed with such.  But there was some heterogeneity between the groups. While the first group reduced their drinking to the largest degree, they also happened to drink more to begin with — “and therefore their consumption was more likely to decline, a phenomenon known as regression to the mean,” explained Matt Field, a professor of psychology at the University of Sheffield in the UK, in an emailed statement.After the treatment, there wasn’t a significant difference between the three groups in terms of how much alcohol they drank. Nine months later, average weekly consumption was roughly the same across the board. The authors say this may have been influenced by losing participants to follow-up.Field said the findings are “promising,” but the claim that the full treatment protocol “leads to ‘unprecedented’ long-lasting reductions in alcohol consumption are not justified on the basis of this data.”Das pointed out other layers to the data, however: Those who completed the exercise and received ketamine had less desire to drink, and they drank less frequently. In addition, there was a correlation among that group between concentrations of ketamine and its breakdown products in the blood, and the reduction in how much participants drank.”People all vary in how quickly they metabolize” and excrete ketamine and its byproducts, Das said. “That level of individual variability with ketamine actually predicts drinking outcomes subsequently.” 

The group that received ketamine alone saw improvements, too, but not to the same degree as those presented with alcohol-related cues, according to the authors.Kranzler said the study is an intriguiguing proof-of-principle that he suspects will spur subsequent studies needed to replicated these findings.But an important question, he added, “is to what degree could combined psychosocial intervention — cognitive behavioral intervention, for example — synergize with or at least augment the pharmacological effect” of ketamine.”That’s the kind of treatment study that I think would make a lot of sense,” he added. “So this wouldn’t be used in isolation.”

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A dose of ketamine could lessen the lure of alcohol

The hallucinogenic drug may help treat addiction by weakening past memories of drinking

Ketamine can reduce harmful drinking by pharmacologically rewriting drinking memories

A single dose of ketamine may cut down problematic drinking. Taken in the right context, the hallucinogenic drug may be able to weaken the pull of the cues that trigger people to drink beer, researchers report November 26 in Nature Communications.

Ketamine’s influence on people’s drinking was modest. Still, the results might be a time when “small effects tell a big story,” says addiction researcher David Epstein of the National Institute on Drug Abuse in Baltimore. “If a seemingly small one-time experience in a lab produces any effects that are detectable later in real life, the data are probably pointing toward something important.”

The study hinges on the idea that addiction, in a way, is a memory disorder. People learn to associate a drug or alcohol with the good feelings it brings. Cues in the world, such as the smell or picture of a beer, can trigger those memories — and cravings. “We’re trying to break down those memories to stop that process from happening, and to stop people from relapsing,” says study coauthor Ravi Das, a psychopharmacologist at University College London.

Ketamine is an anesthetic, that at lower doses, has also shown promise as a treatment for severe depression (SN: 3/21/19). The drug can also affect memories. One of ketamine’s effects in the body is to interfere with a molecule called NMDA, which is involved in reforming memories after they are called up.

Das and his colleagues recruited 90 people who said they drank too much beer, though none was formally diagnosed with alcohol addiction. First, participants were exposed to pictures of beer and even got to drink one in the lab. During the experience, they rated their beer cravings, enjoyment of drinking, and after the beer was gone, the desire to have another one.

A few days later, the participants returned to the lab and were split into three groups. People in one group were again shown pictures of beer to jog their memories. To make the memory recall extra strong, the researchers served up actual beer, but then, in a twist, took it away before participants could drink it. The bait-and-switch maneuver was key, Das says. “You have to generate the element of surprise,” he says.

As a comparison, a second group was shown images of orange juice instead of beer. Then people in both of these groups got an intravenous dose of ketamine. A third group had beer memories called up, but received no ketamine.

A week after the procedure, the people who had their beer memories jogged before receiving ketamine reported less desire to drink, and less enjoyment of beer — a reduction that wasn’t as strong for the other two groups of participants. The people who had their beer-drinking memories jogged and received ketamine also reported drinking less.

The results were surprising, Das says, because attempts to curb people’s drinking in their daily lives are rarely successful (SN: 8/9/17). “You get jaded. Not a lot seems to work,” he says.

Nine months after the procedure, all of the participants, including those who hadn’t received ketamine, had roughly halved their beer drinking — an across-the-board drop that could be explained by the self-awareness that comes simply from enrolling in a study, says Epstein. “Behavior can change for all sorts of reasons that aren’t specific to the experimental treatment,” he says. The interesting thing here, he says, is the initial decline in drinking among people who had ketamine while they were reminded of beer.

More research is needed to confirm ketamine’s short-term effect on drinking, and see how long it might last. Das and his colleagues plan on testing ketamine on more people with problematic drinking habits in clinical trials. The researchers are also trying to weaken other sorts of problematic memories, such as those involved in post-traumatic stress disorder.

As a drug that can be abused, ketamine comes with baggage that may make people reluctant to see it as a way to treat addictions. But if a single dose of ketamine can slow excessive drinking, “then that’s quite an easy trade-off from a health perspective,” Das says. “If it works, it works.”

A Single Dose Of Ketamine Might Help Heavy Drinkers, Study Finds

What if a single dose of ketamine could make a heavy drinker dramatically cut back on booze?

A team at University College London thinks that ketamine may be able to “rewrite” memories that shape a person’s relationship with alcohol. Scientists say that participants who were given ketamine as part of an experimental study dramatically reduced their average alcohol intake for months after the initial dose. Their research was published Tuesday in Nature Communications.

Ketamine — sometimes known as a club drug called Special K that can produce hallucinations — has been shown to be a powerful and fast-acting treatment for depression. Researchers also are looking into whether ketamine can help patients with post-traumatic stress disorder.

The U.K. findings may signal yet another use for the drug for hard-to-treat conditions.

In general, the treatment options for alcoholism “aren’t particularly effective for the majority of people, particularly over the long term,” says Ravi Das, a UCL psychopharmacologist and the study’s lead researcher.

Das thinks part of the problem is that current remedies don’t necessarily help patients deal with positive memories of drinking that could make them want to drink again.

“When people become addicted, they’re learning that kind of behavior in response to things in their environment,” he says. “Those memories, those associative trigger memories, can be really long lasting and really kind of ingrained. And current treatments don’t target those.”

The researchers thought ketamine might be able to target a heavy drinker’s memories, particularly if people had their memories of drinking triggered just before they received a dose of the drug.

To test this, they recruited 90 people who drank much more than average — an average of about four to five pints of beer a day, or about five times the U.K.’s recommended maximum — but had not previously been diagnosed with alcoholism and were not receiving treatment.

On the first day of the experiment, participants were shown pictures of alcoholic drinks and were asked to rate how strong their urge to drink was. All of them were then allowed to drink a beer.

The next day, they were divided into three groups, and none of them received beer. One group did the exercise in which they saw pictures of drinks — to stimulate their memories — and then received a dose of ketamine. The second group saw the drinks and then got a placebo drug. The final group was shown no pictures and received ketamine.

The results were dramatic. Ten days later, those people who did the memory exercise and got ketamine reported a significant drop in their alcohol intake. A follow-up nine months into the experiment showed that their alcohol consumption was half of what it had been.

Meanwhile, the group that got ketamine and didn’t have their memories triggered saw a smaller but still significant reduction in drinking, both at the 10-day mark and nine months later. The placebo group also reported a decrease, albeit a more modest one.

From Chaos To Calm: A Life Changed By Ketamine

From Chaos To Calm: A Life Changed By Ketamine

So why would stimulating memories of drinking prior to a ketamine dose seem to be so effective in reducing alcohol consumption? Das says ketamine is thought to block certain receptors in the brain that help to “restabilize” a memory — such as pleasure from drinking. “You’re kind of stopping the restabilization, and the memory is weakened,” he notes.

John Krystal, head of the psychiatry department at Yale School of Medicine, was among the first researchers to study how ketamine could be helpful to patients who have depression. He says ketamine doesn’t erase memories but can help rewrite them.

“You can help them have a better and more balanced approach to it,” Krystal says. “Like instead of the idea that alcohol is always good no matter how much you drink … someone could instead say, ‘You know, I don’t really need to drink this much.’ “

That lines up with what the participants in the U.K. experiment reported. Das says they “kind of felt the urge to drink less” and “that might be because of this reduction in the way that environmental triggers can spark off the urge to drink.”

Krystal, who was not involved in the research, says this suggests that ketamine could be useful for other conditions that are exacerbated by certain kinds of memories. The drug, he says, could “help them to get control of what they really think and believe about things like alcohol or other drugs, abuse or their traumatic experiences, which otherwise kind of take over their lives in ways that are very maladaptive.”

“I would say this is a very cool study,” Krystal says. “And I think if the findings can be replicated, then it opens up a new window about a strategy to treat alcohol-use disorders.”

Still, he cautions that this is a fairly new idea and that “there are a lot of complexities here that need to be worked out.” Complexities such as whether people with high tolerance to alcohol respond differently to ketamine or whether there’s something inherent about ketamine that makes people want to drink less even without memory recall. “That’s just the nature of research — no single study can really answer all of the questions,” Krystal says.

Das says he hopes that one day, following more study and testing, ketamine could be used in clinical settings to help patients with alcoholism.

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Weekly Ketamine Infusions Show Initial, Repeated Depression Benefits

A new study shows that weekly ketamine infusions are associated with continued and maintained reductions in depressive symptoms among patients with treatment-resistant depression.

The findings, which are considered novel among studies assessing ketamine administration for patients with treatment-resistant depression, evidence the promising role the controversial drug could play in psychiatric care.

A team of investigators, led by Jennifer L. Phillips, PhD, an associate scientist in the Mood Disorders Research Unit at The Royal’s Institute of Mental Health Research, conducted a randomized, double-blind crossover comparison of single ketamine infusion versus active placebo control midazolam. The assessment, held with 41 participants with treatment-resistant depression at single treatment center, observed patients receive 6 open-label ketamine infusions 3 times per week over 2 once patients had a relapse of depressive symptoms.

Patients who reported a decrease of at least 50% in the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) received another 4 additional infusions once weekly in a maintenance phase.

Those administered a single ketamine infusion reported significantly reduced depressive symptoms at the primary efficacy endpoint of 24 hours post-care versus those treated with midazolam. The therapy showed cumulative antidepressant effects over repeated infusions, as well a doubling of antidepressant response rate in patients, according to linear mixed models.

Investigators found that 59% of patients met the response criteria following repeated infusions, with 3 infusions serving as the median dosage required to reach achieved response. In patients receiving weekly maintenance infusions, no further improvement in MADRS scores were reported.

The first-of-its-kind findings come just 1 month following the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of esketamine nasal spray (Spravato) for the treatment of patients with treatment-resistant depression. At the time, the therapy made history as the first novel treatment indicated for depression in 30 years—and headlines as one of the first hallucinogenic drugs to reach indication for a common condition.

Dennis Charney, MD, Dean of Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and a member of the Yale University team that led pioneering antidepressant ketamine trials in the 1990s, told MD Magazine® that microdosing or implementing controversial therapies for psychiatric care require what any other trial requires: control, safety, and a carefully-assessed standard for efficacy.

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NOVA Health Recovery | Alexandria, Va 22306 | Call for esketamine and nasal ketamine as well as IV Ketamine for depression, PTSD, anxiety  703-844-0184 < Link

Call NOVA Health Recovery at 703-844-0184 for a free consultation for a Ketamine infusion. No referral needed. We offer intranasal Ketamine follow up therapy as well. Alexandria, Va 22306.

Call NOVA Health Recovery at 703-844-0184 for a free consultation for a Ketamine infusion. No referral needed. We offer intranasal Ketamine follow up therapy as well. Alexandria, Va 22306.

From Popular Anesthetic to Antidepressant, Ketamine Isn’t the Drug You Think It Is

An hour before we spoke, Darragh O’Carroll, an emergency room physician from Hawaii, had just given an elderly patient a sedating shot of ketamine. The man had pneumonia and was acting confused and fidgety, making him hard to treat.

“Not only it was a pain control for him when I was putting needles into his neck, but it also kept him still,” O’Carroll says. “And with very minimal risk of lowering his blood pressure.”

Ketamine’s use as an anesthetic — and not as a party drug — is widespread, though not commonly known. In fact, the World Health Organizationestimates ketamine is the most widely used anesthetic in the world and keeps it on their list of essential medicines, a category of drugs that all developed countries should have on hand.

O’Carroll has described ketamine as his “favorite medicine of all time” in an article for Tonic, not only because the anesthetic is incredibly safe and effective, but also because of its versatility. It’s most widely used in surgery, but could also help treat severe asthma, chronic pain, and may even possess anti-tumor properties. In the last two decades, ketamine has also emerged as a potent antidepressant, able to treat symptoms of some mental illnesses in less than 72 hours.

“I think the more research that goes into ketamine, the more uses that we find for it,” O’Carroll says.

From PCP to Painkiller

Ketamine’s story begins with a drug called PCP. Yes, that PCP — phencyclidine or so-called “angel dust,” a drug that when smoked can cause a trance-like state, agitation and out-of-body hallucinations. After it was first synthesized by medicinal chemist Victor Maddox in 1956, the drug was briefly approved as an anesthetic by the FDA for its sedative properties. In tests with a wild rhesus monkey, for example, researchers put their fingers in the previously aggressive animal’s mouth and watched its jaw remain slack.

But while it was safe and effective for pain relief, the side effects of PCP soon became too obvious to ignore.

Some patients under the influence of PCP would feel like they lost their arms or legs or that they were floating in space. It could also cause seizures and delirium. Scientists began seeking a shorter-acting anesthetic without convulsant properties. In 1962, chemistry professor Calvin Stevens discovered a PCP analogue that fit the bill: ketamine.

Ketamine is a potent, sedating painkiller that can cause amnesia and is mostly used in surgery and veterinary medicine. During the Vietnam Invasion, ketamine saw widespread use in the U.S. military because it has several advantages over opioids. First, unlike morphine, ketamine doesn’t suppress blood pressure or breathing. It also doesn’t need to be refrigerated, making it useful in the field or in rural areas that don’t have access to electricity.

Ketamine’s benefits extend beyond use as an anesthetic, though — in some cases it can serve as a balm for the mind as well. A 2008 analysis found that burn victims who were given ketamine were less likely to develop symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, even if their injuries were more severe. Those findings have been replicated, such as a 2014 clinical trial of 41 patients, who saw their PTSD symptoms diminish within 24 hours, an effect that lasted for two weeks.

“When somebody gets one of their limbs dramatically blown off or is shot in the face, it’s a very traumatic event,” O’Carroll says. In such a situation, giving ketamine not only provides instant pain relief, it could prevent long-lasting trauma.

Because its chemical structure is so similar to PCP, ketamine can still give lucid hallucinations, such as feeling that your mind has separated from the body — a dissociative state users sometimes call a “K-hole.” One recent study based on users’ written reports even indicated that this kind of experience might be a close analogue to a near-death experience. However, these dissociative states only happen at high doses — the amount of ketamine used to for surgery and to treat depression is typically much lower.

But ketamine’s side effects are less common and easier to manage than PCP. In fact, ketamine is one of the safest drugs used in medicine today and can even be given to young children. For example, ketamine was used to sedatethe boys’ soccer team trapped in a cave in Thailand last year. Putting the kids in a tranquilized state made it easier to rescue them, and ketamine is safer than the opioids or benzodiazepines that are also commonly used as sedatives.  

Ketamine as Antidepressant

But it wasn’t until the 1990s that what could turn out to be ketamine’s most important function was discovered. A team from Yale University School of Medicine was examining the role of glutamate, a common neurotransmitter, in depression, and discovered something remarkable: ketamine could rapidly relieve depression symptoms.

“To our surprise, the patients started saying, they were better in a few hours,” Dennis Charney, one of the researchers, told Bloomberg. This rapid relief was unheard of in psychiatry.

Glutamate is associated with neural plasticity, our brain’s ability to adapt and change at the level of the neuron. Ketamine blocks certain glutamate receptors, but not others, and the end effect could be to promote the growth of new neurons while protecting old ones. This could explain how ketamine can help reset the brain, though the theory hasn’t yet been definitively proven.

The prescription meds currently on the market for depression have some major drawbacks. Drugs like Prozac or Wellbutrin can take a few weeks or months to kick in while worsening symptoms in the short term — not a good combination, especially for someone who is extremely depressed, or even suicidal.

It took around a decade for mainstream science to take notice of these early ketamine-depression studies. But once it did, ketamine clinics began popping up all across North America, offering fast relief for depression, anxiety and other mental illnesses. Patients are given an infusion — an IV drip that lasts about an hour — and many people, but not everyone, have seen rapid relief of their symptoms.

Suddenly, ketamine infusions became trendy, though the science to back up some of the medical claims is still inconclusive, according to STAT. However, ketamine infusions are rarely covered by insurance, although that is changing. A typical session can run $700, with many patients taking six sessions or more. But many of these patients have so-called treatment-resistant depression. They’ve tried other medications or therapies without success and some see ketamine as a last resort.

Steven Mandel, a clinical psychologist and anesthesiologist, has used ketamine on patients since it first came on the market around 50 years ago. In 2014, he began using it for patients with depression and opened Ketamine Clinics of Los Angeles, one of the oldest and largest clinics in the country. They’ve done over 8,000 infusions so far.

“Our success rate is better than 83 percent,” Mandel says. For his clinic, success means a 50 percent improvement of depression symptoms for longer than three months.

Ketamine’s success as an antidepressant couldn’t help but attract the attention of major pharmaceutical companies as well. In 2009, Johnson & Johnson began developing their own version of the drug they called esketamine. Rather than an infusion through a vein, it’s dispensed through a nasal spray. The FDA approved their formulation in early March. It was thefirst drug in 35 years to fight depression using a different approach than traditional drugs.

“Esketamine is a giant step forward,” Mandel says. “It means we’re not going to be demonizing mind-altering substances used for therapeutic purposes. It opens the door to research on LSD, on psilocybin, on MDMA and many other agents that could possibly relieve a great deal of suffering.”

But many clinicians have raised concerns about long-term side effects, such as heart and bladder toxicity. Others have been critical of esketamine, saying there isn’t enough data yet to suggest the drug is safe or effective. Husseini Manji, a neuroscientist who helped develop the drug for Johnson & Johnson at their subsidiary Janssen, has pushed back against these claims.

“When you line up the totality of the studies, it was really an overwhelming amount of data that was all in the same direction,” Manji says in a call. Though just two of the five late-state clinical trials showed significant results, the changes in mood in the three that fell short were “almost identical in magnitude” to the others, Manji says. It was enough for the drug to meet standards for FDA approval.

We can probably expect other ketamine-related drugs to come to market soon. ATAI Life Sciences, a company funding research on the use of magic mushrooms for depression, is developing their own ketamine depression drug. The pharmaceutical company Allergan also developed rapastinel, another ketamine-like drug, though it failed to show any real benefits for patients in later trials. Manji says this is unfortunate for people who could be helped by these kinds of drugs.

“From a patient standpoint, we were hoping it would work,” he says, even though he was not involved in rapastinel’s development. “But sometimes if you really haven’t got the mechanism right and you haven’t really threaded the needle, then sometimes you don’t see these results.”

Drug of Abuse?

Even though ketamine’s medical uses are well-established, most people have only heard of ketamine in the context of a party drug. Because of this bad reputation — and what’s perceived as growing misuse of the drug — several countries, such as China and the UK, have tried to place greater restrictions on ketamine. This would make it harder to study and more expensive in clinical use.

“If it was to ever be rescheduled, places that would be first affected would be you know places that need it most,” O’Carroll says. The WHO has asked at least four times for countries to keep access to ketamine open. “The medical benefits of ketamine far outweigh potential harm from recreational use,” Marie-Paule Kieny, assistant director general for Health Systems and Innovation at WHO, said in 2015.

So far, no countries have put greater restrictions on ketamine, and that’s probably a good thing. Ketamine has a rich history, but its future is still being written.



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NOVA Health Recovery | Alexandria, Va 22306 | Call for esketamine and nasal ketamine as well as IV Ketamine for depression, PTSD, anxiety  703-844-0184 < Link

Ketamine Virginia Link

NOVA Health Recovery | Alexandria, Va 22306 | Call for esketamine and nasal ketamine as well as IV Ketamine for depression, PTSD, anxiety  703-844-0184 < Link

Ketamine Virginia Link

Ketamine-like depression treatment on track for FDA approval

CNN)A ketamine-like drug for treatment-resistant depression was backed by a US Food and Drug Administration advisory committee on Tuesday. If it is then approved by the FDA, the drug — called esketamine — may provide a new option for patients with major depressive disorder who have tried at least two other antidepressants without success.A panel of experts voted to endorse the drug, which is made in nasal spray form by the pharmaceutical company Janssen, a division of Johnson & Johnson. Fourteen members voted that the benefits outweighed the risk, with two opposed and one abstaining.

Ketamine offers lifeline for people with severe depression, suicidal thoughts
703-844-0184 | NOVA Health Recovery | Alexandria, Va 22306

Ketamine offers lifeline for people with severe depression, suicidal thoughtsThe drug is a close relative of ketamine, a powerful medication used in hospitals primarily as an anesthetic; recent scientific studies have also shown its potential with treatment-resistant depression and suicidal ideation. Ketamine is also used recreationally — and illegally — as a club drug known as Special K. It generates an intense high and dissociative effects.Esketamine, which is not FDA-approved for any conditions, targets a different brain pathway than approved antidepressants, many of which have been around for decades. It is expected to be used in combination with antidepressants, but the latter can take a month or two to take effect. Esketamine, on the other hand, might have an effect within hours or days, according to an FDA briefing document.The drug was designated as a breakthrough therapy in 2013, intending to “expedite the development and review of drugs for serious or life-threatening conditions,” the FDA says. First-line treatments don’t work for roughly 30% to 40% of patients with major depressive disorder, according to the briefing document.The FDA does not have to follow the recommendation of advisory committees, though it often does.

ERs 'flooded' with mentally ill patients with no place else to turn

ERs ‘flooded’ with mentally ill patients with no place else to turnHowever, the research behind esketamine has come under some criticism, with two of five key studies failing to meet their primary endpoints. Only one of these studies is a positive short-term trial, whereas most FDA-approved antidepressants are backed by at least two, according to the briefing document. But Janssen has maintained that the overall picture is positive.Adverse events tended to occur in the first two hours patients received the drug, including sedation, blood pressure increases and dissociation. For this reason, patients wouldn’t be able to pick it up at a local pharmacy; it would be given under the supervision of health care professionals who can keep an eye on the person during those first two hours.Because of the drug’s close relationship to ketamine, experts have also raised concerns about its potential for misuse and abuse. The clinical trials have not seen evidence of this risk, according to presentations made during the meeting.Advisory panelists also expressed concern that not enough long-term data was available to characterize the drug’s cognitive effects and other health impacts down the line.Get CNN Health’s weekly newsletter

There were six deaths of patients taking esketamine in trials, including three suicides, but FDA materials concluded “it is difficult to consider these deaths as drug-related.”The only current FDA-approved medication for treatment-resistant depression combines two other drugs already on the market. Other non-pharmaceutical treatments exist, such as electroconvulsive therapy.Janssen spokesman Greg Panico said no information about pricing would be available at this time. An FDA decision is expected in early March, he added.

 

NOVA Health Recovery | Alexandria, Va 22306 | Call for esketamine and nasal ketamine as well as IV Ketamine for depression, PTSD, anxiety  703-844-0184 < Link

Ketamine Virginia Link

Ketamine-like depression treatment on track for FDA approval

CNN)A ketamine-like drug for treatment-resistant depression was backed by a US Food and Drug Administration advisory committee on Tuesday. If it is then approved by the FDA, the drug — called esketamine — may provide a new option for patients with major depressive disorder who have tried at least two other antidepressants without success.A panel of experts voted to endorse the drug, which is made in nasal spray form by the pharmaceutical company Janssen, a division of Johnson & Johnson. Fourteen members voted that the benefits outweighed the risk, with two opposed and one abstaining.

Ketamine offers lifeline for people with severe depression, suicidal thoughts
703-844-0184 | NOVA Health Recovery | Alexandria, Va 22306

Ketamine offers lifeline for people with severe depression, suicidal thoughtsThe drug is a close relative of ketamine, a powerful medication used in hospitals primarily as an anesthetic; recent scientific studies have also shown its potential with treatment-resistant depression and suicidal ideation. Ketamine is also used recreationally — and illegally — as a club drug known as Special K. It generates an intense high and dissociative effects.Esketamine, which is not FDA-approved for any conditions, targets a different brain pathway than approved antidepressants, many of which have been around for decades. It is expected to be used in combination with antidepressants, but the latter can take a month or two to take effect. Esketamine, on the other hand, might have an effect within hours or days, according to an FDA briefing document.The drug was designated as a breakthrough therapy in 2013, intending to “expedite the development and review of drugs for serious or life-threatening conditions,” the FDA says. First-line treatments don’t work for roughly 30% to 40% of patients with major depressive disorder, according to the briefing document.The FDA does not have to follow the recommendation of advisory committees, though it often does.

ERs 'flooded' with mentally ill patients with no place else to turn

ERs ‘flooded’ with mentally ill patients with no place else to turnHowever, the research behind esketamine has come under some criticism, with two of five key studies failing to meet their primary endpoints. Only one of these studies is a positive short-term trial, whereas most FDA-approved antidepressants are backed by at least two, according to the briefing document. But Janssen has maintained that the overall picture is positive.Adverse events tended to occur in the first two hours patients received the drug, including sedation, blood pressure increases and dissociation. For this reason, patients wouldn’t be able to pick it up at a local pharmacy; it would be given under the supervision of health care professionals who can keep an eye on the person during those first two hours.Because of the drug’s close relationship to ketamine, experts have also raised concerns about its potential for misuse and abuse. The clinical trials have not seen evidence of this risk, according to presentations made during the meeting.Advisory panelists also expressed concern that not enough long-term data was available to characterize the drug’s cognitive effects and other health impacts down the line.Get CNN Health’s weekly newsletter

There were six deaths of patients taking esketamine in trials, including three suicides, but FDA materials concluded “it is difficult to consider these deaths as drug-related.”The only current FDA-approved medication for treatment-resistant depression combines two other drugs already on the market. Other non-pharmaceutical treatments exist, such as electroconvulsive therapy.Janssen spokesman Greg Panico said no information about pricing would be available at this time. An FDA decision is expected in early March, he added.



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NEW VARIATION OF KETAMINE TO BE APPROVED BY FDA FOR TREATMENT OF DEPRESSION

“The biggest breakthrough in depression treatment since Prozac”

  • 6 FEBRUARY 2019
New variation of ketamine to be approved by FDA for treatment of depression

Back in July of 2017, the world’s first ketamine trial for depression proved to be “incredibly effective” in curing elderly patients. The drug, often referred to as Special K, is a popular substance found clubland culture, but recent breakthrough studies and the development of chemical variations of ketamine has shown that the drug is a powerful tool that can help save lives and allow people to live life to the fullest potential.

According to Bloomberg, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared the way for the first drug based on ketamine, from Johnson & Johnson, to gain approval as soon as March 2019. The ketamine variant, called esketamine, may very well become the first-ever rapid-acting antidepressant for suicidal patients and “treatment-resistant depression”. While physicians are still unsure about the long term effects of the drug and more trials need to be conducted in order to get to the root of its effectiveness, many doctors think esketamine may be “the biggest breakthrough in depression treatment since Prozac”.

The long-form story published in Bloomberg tells the stories of multiple people who have benefited from ketamine treatment and how the rapid development of this new miracle drug is being used to combat the skyrocketing rate of suicide in the United States (up 33 per cent in the last 20 years).

The drug esketamine provides “a quick molecular reset button for brains impaired by stress or depression”. Initially developed as an intravenous drug, Johnson & Johnson has developed a nasal solution that has the same effect. The initial study of the drug involved 68 people at high risk that were all antidepressants and other treatment – no placebos were used on actively suicidal patients. Of those who were given esketamine, 40 per cent were deemed “no longer at risk of killing themselves within 24 hours”.

As physicians and investors race to find out more about this supposed miracle drug, concerns remain that a new abuse crisis – similar to that of the current opioid crisis – may arise following federal approval of the substance.

Check out the captivating story behind these successful studies here

Learn more about ketamine’s colorful clubland history here.

Find out how we survived an unconventional, silly, hilarious and definitely brilliant musical about ketamine here.

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VA uses ketamine to treat PTSD effectively

The San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center is administering ketamine to veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder and depression.

Tobias Marton, the director of the ketamine infusion program at the center, said that since the program first launched two years ago, they have treated about 40 patients who had virtually exhausted all other options.

“They’ve done everything we’ve asked them to do and they remain with very severe symptoms and with a poor or impaired quality of life,” he said. “Despite (past treatments), there remains a high risk of suicide (with some veterans).”

While it was not clear where the 40 patients are from, the option is something that is available to Humboldt County veterans who are suffering from PTSD or depression.

Marton said that in general, about a third of people diagnosed with depression don’t respond to first, second and third lines of treatment.

In contrast, ketamine infusion has yielded “impressive outcomes.”

Many people know of ketamine as a party drug, often referred to as Special K, but it is mainly used medically for anesthesia or pain treatment.

Miracle of medicine

“We know ketamine has rapid and powerful anti-suicide properties,” he said. “To have another tool, a potentially powerful tool to have an impact on suicide rates is really exciting.”

While Marton is proceeding with “cautious optimism,” Boris Nikolov, the CEO of Neurosciences Medical Clinic in Miami, Florida, which has a ketamine clinic, believes the application might be a medical breakthrough.

It’s one of the greatest discoveries in the field of depression,” he said. “This is one of the miracles in medicine.

Nikolov’s clinic has treated 120 patients with ketamine, including his wife who has PTSD as a result of severe child abuse.

“Ketamine really helped her,” he said. “That was a really big part of her recovery.”

Nikolov said most medicines that treat depression take from two to four weeks to start working. Ketamine begins working within hours after it is administered, a process which usually involves an IV infusion over the course of about an hour.

“What’s most important is the strong and fast effect of ketamine in patients who are very seriously depressed, or want to hurt themselves,” he said. “When they finish treatment, they’re totally different people. There is no other medication that does that.”

Brad Burge, the director of strategic communication at the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, or MAPS, said there has been “an explosion of treatment that’s outpaced research.”

“It means that people are going to have another option, an alternative to conventional medications,” he said.

According to Burge, MAPS believes the best form of ketamine infusion involves pairing with other forms of psychotherapy such as group or individual counseling.

Ketamine availability

While ketamine is an FDA-approved drug which has been used as an anesthetic as well as a pain reliever, it isn’t officially sanctioned by the FDA to be used for treating mental health disorders. However, Marton said that ketamine has been administered in this fashion for over 18 years now.

A company is currently in the process of trying to get an intranasal product approved by the FDA which would administer ketamine through the nasal passage, according to Marton. He expects the FDA’s decision to be announced sometime around March 2019.

If the product is approved, he said, VA clinics in rural communities like the one in Eureka would likely be able to start offering ketamine treatments as well.

For now, only the location in San Francisco is able to offer the treatment, but Marton said anyone within their service realm, which includes Humboldt County, is invited to consult with the VA about seeking treatment.

“We want to be as thoughtful as we can,” he said. “As we understand more about it … (we) might be able to start helping people who we haven’t been able to help despite throwing everything we have at them.”



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What are the uses of ketamine?

Ketamine is a medication that is used to induce loss of consciousness, or anesthesia. It can produce relaxation and relieve pain in humans and animals.

It is a class III scheduled drug and is approved for use in hospitals and other medical settings as an anesthetic.

However, it is also a commonly abused “recreational” drug, due to its hallucinogenic, tranquilizing and dissociative effects.

Controversy has arisen about using ketamine “off-label” to treat depression. Off-label uses of drugs are uses that are not approved by the the United States, (U.S.) Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Ketamine is safe to use in controled, medical practice, but it has abuse potential. Used outside the approved limits, its adverse mental and physical health effects can be hazardous. Prolonged use can lead to tolerance and psychological addiction.

Fast facts on ketamine:Here are some key points about ketamine. More detail is in the main article.

  • Ketamine is similar in structure to phencyclidine (PCP), and it causes a trance-like state and a sense of disconnection from the environment.
  • It is the most widely used anesthetic in veterinary medicine and is used for some surgical procedures in humans.
  • It is considered a “club drug,” like ecstasy, and it has been abused as a date-rape drug.
  • Ketamine should only be used as prescribed by a doctor.

 

What is ketamine?

ketamine and dissociation
703-844-0184 | Ketamine Treatment Center | Fairfax, Va 22304

Ketamine can produce feelings of dissociation when used as a drug of abuse.

Ketamine belongs to a class of drugs known as dissociative anesthetics. It is also known as Ketalar, Ketanest, and Ketaset.

Other drugs in this category include the hallucinogen, phencyclidine (PCP), dextromethorphan (DXM), and nitrous oxide, or laughing gas.

These types of drugs can make a person feel detached from sensations and surroundings, as if they are floating outside their body.

 

Therapeutic uses

Ketamine is most often used in veterinary medicine. In humans, it can induce and maintain general anesthesia before, during, and after surgery.

For medical purposes, ketamine is either injected into a muscle or given through an intravenous (IV) line.

It is considered safe as an anesthetic, because it does not reduce blood pressure or lower the breathing rate.

The fact that it does not need an electricity supply, oxygen, or highly trained staff makes it a suitable option in less wealthy countries and in disaster zones.

In human medical practice, it is used in procedures such as:

  • cardiac catheterization
  • skin grafts
  • orthopedic procedures
  • diagnostic procedures on the eye, ear, nose, and throat
  • minor surgical interventions, such as dental extractions

It has been used in a hospital setting to control seizures in patients with status epilepticus (SE), a type of epilepsy that can lead to brain damage and death. However, researchers point out that ketamine is normally used for this purpose after 5 to 6 other options have proven ineffective. Ketamine for the treatment of refractory status epilepticus

It is also an analgesic, and, in lower doses, it can relieve pain.

In 2014, researchers found that a ketamine infusion significantly reduced symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 41 patients who had undergone a range of traumas.

Efficacy of intravenous ketamine for treatment of chronic posttraumatic stress disorder

Researchers are looking into other possible medical uses of ketamine, particularly in the areas of treatment-resistant depression, suicide prevention, and substance use disorders. However, this use is controversial.

 

Treating depression

Researchers for the American Psychological Association (APA) noted in April 2017 that a number of doctors prescribe ketamine “off-label,” for people with treatment-resistant depression.

However, they caution:

While ketamine may be beneficial to some patients with mood disorders, it is important to consider the limitations of the available data and the potential risk associated with the drug when considering the treatment option.”

The FDA has not yet approved it for treating depression.

In a study published in BMC Medical Ethics, researchers urge doctors to “minimize the risk to patients” by considering carefully the evidence before prescribing ketamine off-label for patients to treat depression and prevent suicide.

Citing “questionable practice” regarding the prescription of ketamine, they point out that there is not enough evidence to prove that ketamine is safe, and that some studies supporting its use have not been sufficiently rigorous in terms of research ethics.

They call for open debate, more research, and for doctors to try all other options first, before prescribing ketamine.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) are currently supporting research into whether ketamine may help people with treatment-resistant depression.

 

Effects

Ketamine use can have a wide variety of adverse effects, including:

  • drowsiness
  • changes in perceptions of color or sound
  • hallucinations, confusion, and delirium
  • dissociation from body or identity
  • agitation
  • difficulty thinking or learning
  • nausea
  • dilated pupils and changes in eyesight
  • inability to control eye movements
  • involuntary muscle movements and muscle stiffness
  • slurred speech
  • numbness
  • amnesia
  • slow heart beat
  • behavioral changes
  • increased pressure in the eyes and brain

It can also lead to a loss of appetite, upset stomach, and vomiting.

When used as an anesthetic in humans, doctors combine it with another drug to prevent hallucinations.

Risks

Ketamine is considered relatively safe in medical settings, because it does not affect the protective airway reflexes, and it does not depress the circulatory system, as other anesthetic medications do.

However, some patients have reported disturbing sensations when awakening from ketamine anesthesia.

Ketamine can cause an increase in blood pressure and intracranial pressure, or pressure in the brain.

People with the following conditions cannot receive ketamine for medical purposes:

  • brain swelling
  • glaucoma
  • brain lesion or tumor

It is used with caution in those with:

  • coronary artery disease
  • increased blood pressure
  • thyroid disease
  • chronic alcohol addiction
  • acute alcohol intoxication
  • aneurysm
  • chest pain
  • mental illness

These effects may be stronger in people aged over 65 years.

Some people may have an allergy to the ingredients. Patients with any type of allergy should tell their doctor before using any medication.

Anyone who is using this drug for therapeutic purposes on a regular basis should have regular blood pressure checks.

As a drug of abuse

Ketamine is most often used in the dance club setting as a party drug. It produces an abrupt high that lasts for about an hour. Users report euphoria, along with feelings of floating and other “out of body” sensations. Hallucinations, similar to those experienced with LSD, are common.

In 2014, 1.4 percent of 12th graders reported using ketamine for recreational purposes. This was down from 2002, when 2.6 percent reported using it.

Street names include:

  • Cat Valium
  • KitKat
  • Special K
  • Vitamin K
  • The horse tranquilizer
  • Ket
  • Purple
  • Super K
  • Jet

It is taken orally as a pill, snorted, smoked with tobacco or marijuana, or mixed into drinks. Most often, it is cooked into a white powder for snorting. Taken orally, it can cause severe nausea and vomiting.

Regardless of how it is ingested, its effects begin within a few minutes and last for less than an hour.

Higher doses can produce more intense effects known as being in the “K-hole,” where users become unable to move or communicate and feel very far away from their body.

Some users seek out this type of transcendental experience, while others find it terrifying and consider it an adverse effect.

Adverse effects

Unwanted effects include:

  • addiction
  • psychosis
  • amnesia
  • impaired motor function
  • high blood pressure
  • respiratory problems
  • seizures

As the user can become oblivious to their environment, ketamine abuse puts the person at risk of accidental injury to themselves and vulnerable to assault by others.

Problems with co-ordination, judgment, and the physical senses can continue for up to 24 hours. If an individual is using ketamine in a recreational setting, a sober friend should remain with them to ensure their safety.

Long-term effects include bladder and kidney problems, stomach pain, and memory loss.

If addiction and dependence develop, there is also a risk of depression.

Frequent, illegal use of ketamine can lead to serious mental disorders and major physical harm to the bladder, known as ketamine-induced ulcerative cystitis.

Ketamine and alcohol

Ketamine toxicity alone is unlikely to lead to death, according to the WHO. However, combining it with other substances, such as alcohol, can increase the sedative effects, possibly leading to a fatal overdose.

In the U.S., 1,550 emergency department (ED) visits were due to illegal ketamine use, and 71.5 percent of these also involved alcohol.

Overdose

The risk of overdose is high, because, for a recreational user, there is only a slight difference in dosage between obtaining the drug’s desired effects and an overdose.

Addiction

Ketamine is a Class III controlled substance. Prolonged use can cause dependence, tolerance, and withdrawal symptoms. Quitting can lead to depression, anxiety, insomnia, and flashbacks.

Chronic users have been known to “binge” their ketamine use in an attempt to experience again the dissociative, euphoric effects of their early first use.

The complications of long-term use can be fatal.

A final word

Ketamine is an anesthetic drug, used in human and veterinary medicine. It is important to distinguish the valid medical uses from the non-medical, recreational use of the drug.

When properly administered by a trained medical professional, ketamine is a safe and valuable medication.

Used in recreational settings, however, ketamine abuse can produce unpredictable physical and mental health results. In the long term, it can lead to psychological damage and, in some cases, death.

Any drug use should be prescribed by a doctor who knows the patient’s full medical history.

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What is ketamine?

Ketamine Nasal SprayKetamine is a drug currently approved by the FDA for use as a general anesthetic during minor surgical procedures such as biopsies. It is widely known as a recreational drug because of its ability to induce cognitive-dissociative, hallucinogenic, and euphoric states in humans. Recently, it has been implicated in research as a potential therapeutic agent in depression especially in patients who have failed previous standard therapies.

Why ketamine?

Standard pharmacologic therapies for depression take several weeks of treatment before patients experience relief. Ketamine is different in that it has been shown to reduce depression symptoms and suicidal ideation in as little as forty minutes. This is considered a potentially lifesaving breakthrough in the treatment of depression because ketamine can rapidly reduce symptoms especially in emergency situations.

How does it work?

The most common medications used in depression affect serotonin in the brain. Ketamine works by a different mechanism. It has been shown to block the glutamate receptors in the brain resulting in its famous hallucinogenic effects. Ketamine has been shown to act on several other receptors, but it is theorized that at low doses, blocking glutamate receptors in the brain may be the reason for its anti-depressive effects.

Who should (and shouldn’t) take ketamine?

Ketamine has not been approved by the FDA for treatment of depression. Although, because of new studies, psychiatrists have been prescribing ketamine “off-label” for patients who did not respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such has Celexa (citalopram), Zoloft (sertraline), or Prozac (fluoxetine) for immediate treatment of symptoms.

Ketamine has been shown to transiently yet significantly increase blood pressure following administration. Patients with high blood pressure should use caution when using ketamine. Ketamine has also been shown to be associated with increases in psychosis or dissociative properties.

Ketamine nasal sprays offer a quick and convenient way to administer ketamine for patients who need immediate relief, although they are currently not available commercially, so you will not find them at your local community pharmacy. Compounding pharmacies have the proper experience, equipment, and personnel to safely compound and customize this medication for you.

References

  1. Ketalar [package insert]. Chestnut Ridge, NY 10977: Par pharmaceutical; 2017 https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2017/016812s043lbl.pdf
  2. Browne CA, Lucki I. Antidepresssant effects of ketamine: mechanisms underlying fast-acting novel antidepressants. Front Pharmacol December 2013.
  3. Lapidus K, Levitch CF, Perez AM, et al. A randomized controlled trial of intranasal ketamine in major depressive disorder. Biol Psychology 2014;76:970–976
  4. Sanacora G, Frye MA, McDonald W, et al. A consensus statement on the use of ketamine in the treatment of mood disorders. JAMA Psychiatry 2017;74(4):399-405.